You Can’t Say No to a Homecoming Ask, Right?

By Tahssya Avant


Your friend has been working on his Homecoming ask for over a week — buying the flowers, making the sign, even practicing how to ask in the mirror. You’ve never seen him talk to the girl he’s asking (okay, maybe once, in seventh grade) but you know that he really likes her, so you encourage him. After all of his preparations, the day finally comes. He makes his move: “Will you go to Homecoming with me?”

Continue reading “You Can’t Say No to a Homecoming Ask, Right?”

School District Should Agree to Union Demands

By Grady Short


After several rallies and rounds of negotiations, the Mercer Island Education Association (MIEA) is set to vote on a potential district-wide strike Sept. 4, the day before school starts.  This decision, if it must be made, would represent a failing on the part of the Mercer Island School District to adequately compensate its employees. Continue reading “School District Should Agree to Union Demands”

When is Affirmative Action Justified in College Admissions?

By Walt McKelvie


Affirmative Action at its best is a temporary, necessary unfairness meant to end centuries of systematic oppression and inequality. It is a sad necessity to bridge the educational and financial gaps between different races, and to ending racial stereotypes. This is why affirmative action programs helping groups facing race-based discrimination, particularly blacks and Hispanics, is a good thing. Continue reading “When is Affirmative Action Justified in College Admissions?”

Tackling America’s School Shooting Epidemic: Can’t We Just Give Everyone Firearms or Something?

By Ellie Gottesman and Grady Short


After yet another unimaginably tragic school shooting, this time in Parkland, Florida, government officials and stable geniuses on the right have finally resolved to stop the killing of more innocent children. Continue reading “Tackling America’s School Shooting Epidemic: Can’t We Just Give Everyone Firearms or Something?”